CYANOnews Sep-Oct 2018 issue is out !

The September-October 2018 issue of CYANOnews is out !

It features, among others, an overview of the CyanoTracker project, open special issues related to cyano-research, new papers acknowledging CYANOCOST, job offers and forthcoming events.

You can download it here:

https://cyanocost.files.wordpress.com/2018/10/cyanonews-issue-10-sep-oct-2018.pdf

The next issue will come out in the end of November. You are welcome to send us any posts and info to be included in CYANOnews and in our media (website, facebook, twitter).

Looking forward to ICHA2018 in Nantes,

CYANOCOST

 

The Principle and Value of the European Multi Lake Survey

Abstract from a recent paper by E. Mantzouki & B. Ibelings, published in  Limnology & Oceanography Bulletin  (ASLO):

On‐going global warming and eutrophication are expected to promote cyanobacterial dominance worldwide. Although increased lake temperature and nutrients are well‐established drivers of blooms, the mechanisms that determine cyanobacterial biomass are complex, with potentially direct, indirect, and interactive effects. Cyanobacteria can produce toxins that constitute a considerable risk for animal and human health and thus a substantial economic cost if we are to ensure safe drinking water. Such global range phenomena should be studied at a wide spatial scale, to directly compare phytoplankton response in different lake types across contrasting climatic zones. The European Multi Lake Survey (EMLS) sought to harness the power of group science in order to sample lakes across Europe and disentangle the effect of environmental stressors on potentially toxic cyanobacterial blooms. The first EMLS results showed that the distribution of cyanobacterial toxins and the toxic potential in lakes will be highly dependent on direct and indirect effects of temperature. If nutrients are not regulated, then they may interact synergistically with increased lake temperatures to promote cyanobacterial growth more than that of other phytoplankton taxa. Providing continental scale evidence is highly significant for the development of robust models that could predict cyanobacterial or algal response to environmental change.

Reference:

Mantzouki, E. and Ibelings, B. W. (2018), The Principle and Value of the European Multi Lake Survey. Limnology and Oceanography Bulletin. . doi:10.1002/lob.10259

First report of cyanotoxins in Lake Yerevan, Armenia.

Abstract of a paper from a collaboration within CYANCOST (Armenia, USA, Greece), that was authored by  Minasyan et al. and published in Toxicon:

“This paper presents the first report of cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins from the South Caucasus region, in particular from Lake Yerevan (Armenia). Microcystis, Dolichospermum and Planktothrix were the key genera identified during the growing season. A trend of a remarkable increase in cyanobacterial densities was observed from 2012 to 2013 exhibiting bloom formation in June (by Nostoc linckia) with the highest values in June and August 2013, reaching up to 695.9*103 cells mL−1. Seasonal dependence of cyanobacterial density on temperature, and temperature as a driver for cyanobacterial cells growth and development were suggested. Biogenic nutrients were identified as co-drivers determining species richness and dominance, as well as the distribution of phytoplankton in different parts of the reservoir.

Cyanotoxin concentrations in the filtered biomass were reported during July 2012 for both stations of the reservoir (left and right bank). Microcystin-RR (MC-RR) was the most abundant and the most frequently observed cyanotoxin. Lower MC-LR concentrations were identified in all samples from both stations, with the highest values observed at the right bank in July 2012. [D-Asp3]MC-RR, MC-YR, MC-HtyR, [D-Asp3]MC-LR, MC-HilR, MC-WR, MC-LY and MC-LW were also identified in trace levels. Anatoxin-a (ANA) was reported in the samples from both stations during August 2012. Cylindrospermopsin (CYN) was present in trace concentrations in samples from both stations during July and in the sample from the left bank during September.”

This paper acknowledges CYANOCOST.

Reference:

Arevik Minasyan, Christophoros Christophoridis, Alan E. Wilson, Sevasti-Kiriaki Zervou, Triantafyllos Kaloudis, Anastasia Hiskia (2018). Diversity of cyanobacteria and the presence of cyanotoxins in the epilimnion of Lake Yerevan (Armenia). Toxicon 150, 28-38.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.toxicon.2018.04.021.

CYANOCOST comments on the proposed revision of the DWD, regarding microcystins.

The Steering Group (SG) of CYANOCOST has submitted comments to the European Commission about the inclusion of MC-LR in the proposed revision of the Drinking Water Directive (DWD). Based on the facts presented in this response the SG proposes the inclusion of all microcystins in the Drinking Water Guideline in the following manner: the reference to the parameter “microcystin-LR” in the proposed Drinking Water Directive should be replaced by “sum of all detected microcystin variants”. The parametric value should stay at 1.0 µg/l.

You can read the CYANOCOST comments in the EC webpage (download the file with feedback).

CYANOCOST at COST Info Day Greece, 27 March 2018

COST will be holding an Info Day on Tuesday 27th March 2018 at NCSR Demokritos, Athens, Greece. COST President, Prof. Sierd Cloetingh will give an opening presentation on “Promoting and Spreading Research Excellence: Perspectives from COST”.

Dr. Theodoros Triantis, Grant Holder of CYANOCOST will present “CYANOCOST (COST Action ES1105) – Networking and impacts beyond the funding period”.

Details of the event in the COST website.

Details of the event in GSRT website (in Greek).

 

Available now ! Updated list of CYANOCOST publications – 201 published items

A complete list of all publications that acknowledge CYANOCOST as of December 2017 is now available in the “Publications” page of cyanocost.net. The list contains as much as 201 published items, with citations and DOI links.

It includes:

– 86 peer-reviewed papers in various journals

– 15 papers of the CYANOCOST Special Issue in Aquatic Ecology

– 14 papers of the CYANOCOST Special Issue in AIOL

– 66 Chapters and SOPs of the Handbook of Cyanobacterial Monitoring and Cyanotoxin Analysis

– 16 Chapters of the Molecular Tools for the Detection and Quantification of Toxigenic Cyanobacteria

– 3 other book chapters

– the Potentially Toxic Cyanobacteria in inland waters of Slovenia book

– a publicized article.

The list is available as a pdf file with DOI links to the publisher’s websites, as well as a compressed (.zip) EndNote library.

As the CYANOCOST library is still being populated, you are welcome to submit your papers that acknowledge CYANOCOST to be included in the next update of the library.

Download the pdf file.

Download the EndNote library.

 

CYANOCOST.net infographic showing its visibility in 2017

CYANOCOST.net is one year old !

The website was live in January 2017, powered by wordpress.com. The website analytics for 2017 show that the number of visitors were 4211 with 6823 views (on average 1.62 views per visitor). Visitors landed on CYANOCOST.net from as many as 104 different countries, including many countries that are not represented in the Cyanocost network. Surprisingly, the website was -by far- mostly viewed from USA and it had also many views from countries not participating formally in the network, e.g. India, Brazil, Canada, Australia and others. Most visitors link to CYANOCOST.net through facebook, search engines and twitter (CYANOCOST has now more than 1000 followers in facebook and twitter).

You can view the Infographic with CYANOCOST.net analytics for 2017.

Stay tuned in 2018 for more CYANOCOST dissemination !

 

Toxic cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins in European waters – A review of CYANOCOST contributions

A review by Meriluoto et al. (Advances in Oceanography and Limnology, 2017; 8(1): 161-178) summarizes the outcomes of some recent European research concerning toxic cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins, with an emphasis on developments within the framework of the CYANOCOST Action. Highlights of the Action include phycological and ecological studies, development of advanced techniques for cyanotoxin analysis, elucidation of cyanotoxin modes of action, management techniques to reduce cyanobacterial mass development, and research on methods and practices for cyanotoxin removal during drinking water treatment. The authors have identified a number of gaps in knowledge. Proposed directions for future research on toxic cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins are also discussed.

The review is open-access and can be downloaded here.

This review is published within the CYANOCOST Special Issue in AIOL that can be downloaded here.