SETAC Europe 2020 Session: Marine and Freshwater Pelagic and Benthic Harmful Algal Blooms

SETAC Europe 30th Annual meeting will take place on 3-7 May 2020 in Dublin, Ireland.

A Session on “Marine and Freshwater Pelagic and Benthic Harmful Algal Blooms: Toxins Production, Detection, Fate, Effects, Monitoring and Management” (Co-chairs Triantafyllos Kaloudis, James Lazorchack) is scheduled under “Track 6”. 

You can submit your abstracts by 27 November 2019.

Link to the session (Track 6).

Description:

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) in freshwater and marine systems are defined as an assemblage of eukaryotic or prokaryotic plankton which have the potential to cause negative health, ecological or economic impacts. These negative impacts are caused by mechanisms that include, but are not limited to, public health and environmental risks from toxin(s) production, light attenuation, diurnal swings in pH and dissolved oxygen, offensive tastes and odors, and impaired visual aesthetics. Examples of some of the major toxins found in various combinations are: (a) prokaryotes (cyanobacteria) – microcystins, cylindrospermopsins, anatoxins, nodularin and saxitoxins; and (b) eukaryotes (dinoflagellates, diatoms, chrysophytes and raphidophytes) euglenophysins, prymensins, brevetoxins, ciguatoxins, saxitoxins and domoic acid. In recent years, there has been new information about the potential threat of benthic (attached and/or buried) toxin-producing cyanobacteria and algae. However, there are still many uncertainties about planktonic and benthic cyanobacteria/algae and the nature of their benthic/pelagic life stages. There is also some uncertainty concerning whether there is a greater risk to aquatic life due to the effects of filamentous and matt forming toxin and non-toxin producing algae on feeding inhibition and smothering. What are the current knowledge gaps related to blooms of benthic cyanobacteria/algae on substrates (attached) and/or in sediment (buried)? What research is required to address these gaps? Do we have enough knowledge to develop mitigation plans and predictive models? What tools are available to track and monitor benthic cyanobacteria/algae and their associated toxins in freshwater and marine environments, and are these fit for purpose? What information do we need to make informed risk assessments and are our current tools/techniques sufficient? How should we best incorporate ‘omics techniques into benthic cyanobacterial/algal research? What are the risks of filamentous of matt forming cyanobacteria and algae? What are the current regulations available to address both benthic and pelagic HABS and what are the current difficulties in managing the conditions that contribute to toxin production? To help address these questions, the objective of this session is to exchange information on the distribution, detection, identification, , occurrence and interaction of both benthic and planktonic cyanobacteria and algae and their associated toxins and finally management tools or approaches to reduce occurrence of blooms.

https://dublin.setac.org/programme/scientific-programme/scope-tracks/

Job for postdoctoral researcher with ecological modelling and programming skills in Ireland

Project:  WATexR  a Climate JPI project led by Dr Rafa Marce (ICRA, Gerona, ES)

Position location: Marine Institute, Burrishoole, Newport, Co. Mayo working with Dr Elvira de Eyto.

Summary of the Role:

The Marine Institute, in collaboration with Dundalk Institute of Technology (project partners), wishes to recruit a post-doctoral researcher with modelling and programming skills for a period of up to 34 months, who will have a central role in implementing the WATexR research project along with the international project team.  The researcher will be primarily based in the Marine Institute facility at Newport, Co. Mayo, Ireland reporting to Dr Elvira de Eyto and also working with Dr Eleanor Jennings (DkIt, IE).

A full description of the job can be downloaded here.

(This post was shared by Eleanor Jennings, Chair of NETLAKE).

Postdoc position: high frequency monitoring data – Ireland

A postdoc position is available for three years working on high frequency monitoring data from lakes and rivers, based in the Marine Institute facility in Mayo, Ireland and employed by Dundalk Institute of Technology (working with  Eleanor Jennings (DkIT) and Elvira de Eyto (MI)) on the BEYOND 2020 project.

See https://www.euraxess.ie/jobs/181690