SETAC Europe 2020 Session: Marine and Freshwater Pelagic and Benthic Harmful Algal Blooms

SETAC Europe 30th Annual meeting will take place on 3-7 May 2020 in Dublin, Ireland.

A Session on “Marine and Freshwater Pelagic and Benthic Harmful Algal Blooms: Toxins Production, Detection, Fate, Effects, Monitoring and Management” (Co-chairs Triantafyllos Kaloudis, James Lazorchack) is scheduled under “Track 6”. 

You can submit your abstracts by 27 November 2019.

Link to the session (Track 6).

Description:

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) in freshwater and marine systems are defined as an assemblage of eukaryotic or prokaryotic plankton which have the potential to cause negative health, ecological or economic impacts. These negative impacts are caused by mechanisms that include, but are not limited to, public health and environmental risks from toxin(s) production, light attenuation, diurnal swings in pH and dissolved oxygen, offensive tastes and odors, and impaired visual aesthetics. Examples of some of the major toxins found in various combinations are: (a) prokaryotes (cyanobacteria) – microcystins, cylindrospermopsins, anatoxins, nodularin and saxitoxins; and (b) eukaryotes (dinoflagellates, diatoms, chrysophytes and raphidophytes) euglenophysins, prymensins, brevetoxins, ciguatoxins, saxitoxins and domoic acid. In recent years, there has been new information about the potential threat of benthic (attached and/or buried) toxin-producing cyanobacteria and algae. However, there are still many uncertainties about planktonic and benthic cyanobacteria/algae and the nature of their benthic/pelagic life stages. There is also some uncertainty concerning whether there is a greater risk to aquatic life due to the effects of filamentous and matt forming toxin and non-toxin producing algae on feeding inhibition and smothering. What are the current knowledge gaps related to blooms of benthic cyanobacteria/algae on substrates (attached) and/or in sediment (buried)? What research is required to address these gaps? Do we have enough knowledge to develop mitigation plans and predictive models? What tools are available to track and monitor benthic cyanobacteria/algae and their associated toxins in freshwater and marine environments, and are these fit for purpose? What information do we need to make informed risk assessments and are our current tools/techniques sufficient? How should we best incorporate ‘omics techniques into benthic cyanobacterial/algal research? What are the risks of filamentous of matt forming cyanobacteria and algae? What are the current regulations available to address both benthic and pelagic HABS and what are the current difficulties in managing the conditions that contribute to toxin production? To help address these questions, the objective of this session is to exchange information on the distribution, detection, identification, , occurrence and interaction of both benthic and planktonic cyanobacteria and algae and their associated toxins and finally management tools or approaches to reduce occurrence of blooms.

https://dublin.setac.org/programme/scientific-programme/scope-tracks/

New marine cyanobacteria species found by Cyanolab in Aegean sea

A new paper by Konstantinou et al. from Cyanolab AUTH (Head: Dr. Spyros Gkelis), published in Journal of Phycology. The authors propose a novel marine genus Leptothoe gen. nov. and describe three new sponge-associated species:  Le. sithoniana, Le. kymatousa, and Le.  spongobia, based on a combination of molecular, chemical and morphological approach. The new sponge-associated Leptothoe species show distinct characters compared to other marine Leptolyngbyaceae, reinforcing the investigation of cyanobacterial diversity associated with sponges. Interestingly, Leptothoe spongobia TAU-MAC 1115 isolated from the sponge Acanthella acuta was shown to produce microcystin-RR indicating that microcystin production among marine cyanobacteria could be more widespread than previously determined.

Reference:

Konstantinou, D., Voultsiadou, E., Panteris, E., Zervou, S. K., Hiskia, A., & Gkelis, S. (2019). Leptothoe, a new genus of marine cyanobacteria (Synechococcales) and three new species associated with sponges from the Aegean Sea. Journal of phycology.  https://doi.org/10.1111/jpy.12866

 

ProSynFest 2020 – A conference devoted to marine cyanobacteria – Cordoba, March 2020.

We are pleased to announce ProSynFest2o20 (March 18-21, 2020 in Cordoba, Spain), a conference almost entirely devoted to the marine picocyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus. It starts with an (optional) one-day technical workshop on March 18th. The conference itself lasts 3 days and will gather most world specialists of marine picocyanobacteria.
The conference program is available here: www.prosynfest2020.com/

Yours sincerely,
Dr. F. Partensky, member of the organizing committee

Save the date: 19th ICHA October 11-16, 2020. La Paz, B.C.S. Mexico

The 19th International Conference on Harmful Algae will take place from the 11th to the 16th of October 2020 in La Paz, BCS, Mexico, being the 2nd ICHA conference held in Latin America. As the last conferences, the 2020 conference will include topics related with the understanding of the causes, evolution and impacts of harmful microalgae and cyanobacteria. We are planning an enjoyable meeting where scientists can present their research, share their ideas, establish new collaborations, and connect the science on harmful algae with the beneficiaries of this research.

La Paz is an ideal city for the meeting where many academic institutes are found. It is a small, secure and quiet city, with beautiful surroundings, which is visited by many international tourists and academics year round. The average temperature in October is between 21 and 34 °C.

For some countries a visa may be required. Please check visa regulations well in advance with your local Mexican Consulate for official instructions on the specific visa regulations and application procedures.

As the major host of the conference, ISSHA will support the event with various activities: Travel awards to students and post-docs, several achievement awards, and ISSHA auction.

Looking forward to seeing you in La Paz, Mexico!

The Organizing Committee,

www.icha2020.com

Three papers published so far in “Marine Bacterial Toxins” Special Issue. Submissions still open !

Three papers have been published in the Marine Drugs Special Issue “Marine Bacterial Toxins”, that is edited by Prof. Hanna Mazur-Marzec and Dr. Anna Toruńska-Sitarz (University of Gdańsk).

You can have open access to the papers through the Special Issue website:
http://www.mdpi.com/journal/marinedrugs/special_issues/marine_bacterial_toxins

The call for submission of papers for this issue is still open. The submission deadline is 20 December 2018.You can contact the editors if you are planning to submit a paper.

Special Issue “Potentially Toxic Benthic Microorganisms in Freshwater and Marine Ecosystems”

Dr. Philipp Hess (Ifremer, France) and Dr. Jean-Francois Humbert (Sorbonne University, France) are editors of a Special Issue titled “Potentially Toxic Benthic Microorganisms in Freshwater and Marine Ecosystems”, in Toxins (MDPI). This special issue belongs to the section “Marine and Freshwater Toxins“.
The aim of the  Special Issue is to “gather the most recent research on benthic cyanobacteria and microalgae proliferating in marine and freshwater ecosystems and on their toxins. All papers dealing with the taxonomy, genetic diversity, ecology and toxicity of biofilms dominated by potentially-toxic cyanobacteria and microalgae and on risk assessment and management associated with such assemblages will be considered in this Special Issue.
The deadline for manuscript submissions is 31 August 2019, but papers will be published as soon as they are accepted following peer-review, i.e. well before the deadline and typically within 4-8 weeks from submission. 
Information about manuscript submission for this Special Issue can be found in the Issue’s webpage.
You can share this information with colleagues that may be interested to publish in this Special Issue.

ICHA2018 Session: Ecology-harmful algae and global change

A Session on  “Ecology – Harmful Algae and Global Change” is organized by Gustaaf HALLEGRAEFF, Myriam BORMANS and Raffaele SIANO, within ICHA2018  in Nantes (21 to 26 October 2018).

Over the last few decades, an increase in frequency and intensity of harmful algal blooms as well as changes in the biogeography and in the temporal dynamics of species and functional groups have been associated to ecosystem variations of both natural and antropogenic origins. This session is focused on the observed and forecasted effects of the climate and of the human driven on the ecology of toxic cyanobacteria and eukaryotic microalgae. We welcome contributions using experimental analyses, in situ observations or model predictions which advance our understanding on the selection of harmful algae in a warmer and changing future. Studies which consider interactions between abiotic and/or biotic drivers on bloom development, composition and toxicity in the context of climate changes are particularly encouraged.

The deadline for abstract submission is 15 April 2018 !!!

See the list of session topics of ICHA2018.

 

ICHA2018: Sessions announced (Nantes, October 2018)

The 18th edition of the International Conference on Harmful Algae (ICHA2018) will take place on 21-26 October 2018 in Nantes, France. The session topics of ICHA2018 were recently announced; they cover all aspects of marine and freshwater HABs.

The deadline for abstract submission is 15 April 2018.

 

Special Issue: Emerging Marine Biotoxins (Toxins, Sep. 2018)

A Special Issue on “Emerging Marine Biotoxins” is under development in Toxins (MDPI), by Guest Editors Prof. Dr. Ana Gago-Martínez (University of Vigo, Spain) and Dr. Arjen Gerssen (RIKILT Wageningen Research, The Netherlands)

“This Special Issue will cover all emerging toxins that might be considered as a threat to human health, and different aspects, including analytical methods for detection and quantification, rapid tests for screening, toxicology, mode of action, occurrence, epidemiology, are considered as the main areas of interest.”

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2018.

Details about this Special Issue can be found in the Toxins website.

toxins-logo

Position as a researcher in marine and coastal lagoon ecology – Sardinia, Italy

The deadline for applications for the position as a researcher in marine and coastal lagoon ecology has been extended to 31 January 2018.

One post-graduate researcher position is available at the Foundation IMC International Marine Centre in Oristano, Sardinia, Italy (http://www.fondazioneimc.it/) in the field of sustainable management and conservation of Mediterranean coastal marine and lagoon environments.

We are seeking for a researcher with expertise in ecology of marine organisms and transitional aquatic environments. In particular, the successful candidate will have to evaluate the interactions between ecological processes and human activities in Mediterranean coastal-marine and lagoon environments assessing environmental quality of marine and transitional areas.

DUTIES AND RESPONSABILITIES

The successful applicant will be expected to:

  • assess the impacts of fishing and aquaculture activities on marine and coastal lagoon environments;
  • monitor and characterize benthic assemblages and fish communities in coastal marine and lagoon environment;
  • assess biotic and abiotic factors affecting benthic assemblages.

The position’s description and application form can be found here.