The Oxford Word of the Year 2018 is… “toxic”.

The Oxford Word of the Year 2018 is… “toxic”.

From the article published by Oxford Dictionaries:

“Data show that, along with a 45% rise in the number of times it has been looked up on oxforddictionaries.com, over the last year the word toxic has been used in an array of contexts, both in its literal and more metaphorical senses.”

“One of the many environmental issues discussed this year has been the toxic algae disaster in Florida, US. Thanks to a central role in the state’s Senate mid-terms race, toxic algae garnered so much commentary that ‘algae’ featured as the ninth-most frequently seen toxic collocate for 2018.

Link to the article.

 

Occurrence and diversity of cyanotoxins in Greek lakes

From the abstract of a recent paper published by Christophoridis et al. in Scientific Reports:

“Toxic cyanobacteria occur in Greek surface water bodies. However, studies on the occurrence of cyanotoxins (CTs) are often limited to mainly microcystins (MCs), with use of screening methods, such as ELISA, that are not conclusive of the chemical structure of the CT variants and can be subject to false positive results. A multi-lake survey in Greece (14 lakes) was conducted in water and biomass, targeted to a wide range of multi-class CTs including MCs, nodularin-R (NOD), cylindrospermopsin (CYN), anatoxin-a (ANA-a) and saxitoxins (STXs), using multi-class/variant LC-MS/MS analytical workflows, achieving sensitive detection, definitive identification and accurate quantitation. A wide variety of CTs (CYN, ANA-a, STX, neoSTX, dmMC-RR, MC-RR, MC-YR, MC-HtyR, dm3MC-LR, MC-LR, MC-HilR, MC-WR, MC-LA, MC-LY, MC-LW and MC-LF), were detected, with MCs being the most commonly occurring. In biomass, MC-RR was the most abundant toxin, reaching 754 ng mg−1 dw, followed by MC-LR (458 ng mg−1 dw). CYN and ANA-a were detected for the first time in the biomass of Greek lakes at low concentrations and STXs in lakes Trichonis, Vistonis and Petron. The abundance and diversity of CTs were also evaluated in relation to recreational health risks, in a case study with a proven history of MCs (Lake Kastoria).”

The study was funded by the project ARISTEIA: “CYANOWATER” coordinated by A. Hiskia (NCSR Demokritos) and it also acknowledges CYANOCOST.

Reference:

Christophoros Christophoridis, Sevasti-Kiriaki Zervou, Korina Manolidi, Matina Katsiapi, Maria Moustaka-Gouni, Triantafyllos Kaloudis, Theodoros M. Triantis, Anastasia Hiskia* (2018). Occurrence and diversity of cyanotoxins in Greek lakes. Scientific Reports volume 8, Article number: 17877. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-35428-x

 

 

 

2nd Announcement : ICTC11, Krakow, 5-10 May 2019

We would like to inform you of the second announcement and invite all of you to attend the “11th International Conference on Toxic Cyanobacteria” (ICTC 11), which will be held in Kraków, Poland, from 5 to 10 May 2019. All those interested in ICTC 11 will find detailed information about the conference at http://www.ictc11.org.

The deadline for abstract submission is 15 January 2019.

Dariusz Dziga
Iwona Jasser
Mikołaj Kokociński
Joanna Mankiewicz-Boczek
Hanna Mazur-Marzec
Barbara Pawlik-Skowrońska

Local Organizing Committee

Special Issue “Effects of Harmful Cyanobacteria on Ecosystem Functioning, Food Webs, and Water Quality”- Water, MDPI

Dear Colleagues,

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) in frehwaters and partly also in brackish, coastal seas are frequently dominated by cyanobateria. Cyanobacterial blooms are well established as indicators of environmental degradation. Beyond the role as indicators, bloom forming Cyanobacteria by themselves are a serious threat to the functioning of aquatic ecosystems and resources and services provided by aquatic ecosystems. Because of their mechanical properties and the toxicity of several of them, harmful Cyanobacteria may seriously inhibit matter and energy transfer through the food webs. Dense aggregations of cyanobacterial biomass lead to chemical alterations of the water, including pH-changes and a subsequent shift from NH+-ions to toxic NH3, and the release of toxins from live cells and after cell lysis. This, in turn, can lead to animal kills and health hazards for humans via drinking water, consumption of fish, and recreational use. The planned Special Issue should summmarize recent advances in the monitoring, analysis, and prevention of harfmul cyanobacteria and their adverse effects on ecosystem functioning, food webs, and water quality. Among others, possible topics include the effects of cyanobacteria on water chemistry, deep water, and sediment anoxia, grazing inhibition, animal kills, biodiversity, ecological status, human health, and analyses of societal costs.

Prof. Dr. Maria Moustaka-Gouni
Prof. Dr. Ulrich Sommer
Guest Editors

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020

Link to the webpage of the special issue.

Special Issue: Advancing Knowledge on Cyanobacterial Blooms in Freshwaters – Water-MDPI

Dear Colleagues,

Cyanobacterial blooms are a water quality problem that has been widely acknowledged to cause detrimental ecological and economic effects in drinking and recreational waters supplies, and fisheries. There is increasing evidence that cyanobacterial blooms have increased globally and are likely to expand in water resources due to climate change. Of most concern are cyanotoxins, along with mechanisms that induce their release and fate in the aquatic envirornment. These secondary metabolites pose a potential hazard to human health and agricultural and aquaculture products directed for animal and human consumption; therefore, strict and reliable control of cyanotoxins is crucial for assessing risk. In this direction, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms that determine cyanobacterial bloom structures and toxin production become a target for managing practices.This Special Issue aims to bring together recent research of multi- and interdisciplinary approaches from the field to the laboratory and back again, driven by working hypotheses based on any aspect from ecological theory to applied research on mitigating cyanobacterial blooms. Of special interest are papers that suggest the use of complementary approaches, from the most recently developed molecular-based methods to more classical approaches and experimental and mathematical modeling regarding factors (abiotic and/or biotic) that control the diversity of not only the key bloom forming cyanobacterial species, but also their interactions to other biota, either in frehswater systems or their adjacent habitats, and their role in preventing and/or promoting cyanobacterial growth and toxin production and/or degradation.

Prof. Dr. Elisabeth (Savi) Vardaka
Prof. Dr. Konstantinos Ar. Kormas
Guest Editors

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2019

Link to the Special Issue website (Water-MDPI).

IOC-UNESCO HARMFUL ALGAE NEWS No. 61 is now available!

Harmful Algae News (HAN) is an IOC (UNESCO) newsletter created to respond to the expressed wishes of participants in several IOC workshops on harmful algal blooms, in particular the IOC-SCOR Workshop in Newport, Rhode Island (USA), 2-3 November 1991. Its purpose is to disseminate information on harmful algal events and on research results as well as to announce research and management programmes, conferences, meetings etc. The initial address list included all the participants in the V International Conference on Harmful Algal Blooms. Nowadays, HAN has more than 2000 subscribers.

HARMFUL ALGAE NEWS No. 61 now online @ http://www.e-pages.dk/ku/1401/

Visit the ISSHA webpage for more resources on Harmful Algae.

Request for collaborators – FunAqua project

Dear CyanoCOST Members and colleagues,

We are looking for collaborators to a unique global water sampling project with an overall objective to describe the global diversity of aquatic fungi and determine the abiotic drivers of fungal communities. Please find the description of the project :

http://pk.emu.ee/en/structure/hydrobiologyandfishery/research/projects/international-projects/funaqua/ 

Let us know if you are interested in participating by registering in the google sheet .

We also ask you to share this invitation with your colleagues and enthusiastic amateurs.

Sincerely,
Kristel Panksep and the FunAqua core team

Kristel Panksep,

FunAqua project coordinator, Estonian University of Life Sciences, Centre for Limnology, University of Tartu, Institute of Ecology and earth Sciences, Chair of Mycology​

kristel.panksep@emu.ee

CYANOnews Sep-Oct 2018 issue is out !

The September-October 2018 issue of CYANOnews is out !

It features, among others, an overview of the CyanoTracker project, open special issues related to cyano-research, new papers acknowledging CYANOCOST, job offers and forthcoming events.

You can download it here:

https://cyanocost.files.wordpress.com/2018/10/cyanonews-issue-10-sep-oct-2018.pdf

The next issue will come out in the end of November. You are welcome to send us any posts and info to be included in CYANOnews and in our media (website, facebook, twitter).

Looking forward to ICHA2018 in Nantes,

CYANOCOST