Special Issue: Advancing Knowledge on Cyanobacterial Blooms in Freshwaters – Water-MDPI

Dear Colleagues,

Cyanobacterial blooms are a water quality problem that has been widely acknowledged to cause detrimental ecological and economic effects in drinking and recreational waters supplies, and fisheries. There is increasing evidence that cyanobacterial blooms have increased globally and are likely to expand in water resources due to climate change. Of most concern are cyanotoxins, along with mechanisms that induce their release and fate in the aquatic envirornment. These secondary metabolites pose a potential hazard to human health and agricultural and aquaculture products directed for animal and human consumption; therefore, strict and reliable control of cyanotoxins is crucial for assessing risk. In this direction, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms that determine cyanobacterial bloom structures and toxin production become a target for managing practices.This Special Issue aims to bring together recent research of multi- and interdisciplinary approaches from the field to the laboratory and back again, driven by working hypotheses based on any aspect from ecological theory to applied research on mitigating cyanobacterial blooms. Of special interest are papers that suggest the use of complementary approaches, from the most recently developed molecular-based methods to more classical approaches and experimental and mathematical modeling regarding factors (abiotic and/or biotic) that control the diversity of not only the key bloom forming cyanobacterial species, but also their interactions to other biota, either in frehswater systems or their adjacent habitats, and their role in preventing and/or promoting cyanobacterial growth and toxin production and/or degradation.

Prof. Dr. Elisabeth (Savi) Vardaka
Prof. Dr. Konstantinos Ar. Kormas
Guest Editors

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2019

Link to the Special Issue website (Water-MDPI).

Special Issue “Potentially Toxic Benthic Microorganisms in Freshwater and Marine Ecosystems”

Dr. Philipp Hess (Ifremer, France) and Dr. Jean-Francois Humbert (Sorbonne University, France) are editors of a Special Issue titled “Potentially Toxic Benthic Microorganisms in Freshwater and Marine Ecosystems”, in Toxins (MDPI). This special issue belongs to the section “Marine and Freshwater Toxins“.
The aim of the  Special Issue is to “gather the most recent research on benthic cyanobacteria and microalgae proliferating in marine and freshwater ecosystems and on their toxins. All papers dealing with the taxonomy, genetic diversity, ecology and toxicity of biofilms dominated by potentially-toxic cyanobacteria and microalgae and on risk assessment and management associated with such assemblages will be considered in this Special Issue.
The deadline for manuscript submissions is 31 August 2019, but papers will be published as soon as they are accepted following peer-review, i.e. well before the deadline and typically within 4-8 weeks from submission. 
Information about manuscript submission for this Special Issue can be found in the Issue’s webpage.
You can share this information with colleagues that may be interested to publish in this Special Issue.

Useful resources for the HABs season – EPA Freshwater HABs Newsletter

The May 2018 issue of the US EPA Freshwater HABs Newsletter is published.

It features, among others, a list of tools and resources for the HABs season. The list of resources is useful for drinking water supplies, bathing water authorities and the general public.

You can download the newsletter here.

For subscription to the newsletter, comments, feedback or additional information, you can contact Lesley D’Anglada.

ICHA2018 Session: Ecology-harmful algae and global change

A Session on  “Ecology – Harmful Algae and Global Change” is organized by Gustaaf HALLEGRAEFF, Myriam BORMANS and Raffaele SIANO, within ICHA2018  in Nantes (21 to 26 October 2018).

Over the last few decades, an increase in frequency and intensity of harmful algal blooms as well as changes in the biogeography and in the temporal dynamics of species and functional groups have been associated to ecosystem variations of both natural and antropogenic origins. This session is focused on the observed and forecasted effects of the climate and of the human driven on the ecology of toxic cyanobacteria and eukaryotic microalgae. We welcome contributions using experimental analyses, in situ observations or model predictions which advance our understanding on the selection of harmful algae in a warmer and changing future. Studies which consider interactions between abiotic and/or biotic drivers on bloom development, composition and toxicity in the context of climate changes are particularly encouraged.

The deadline for abstract submission is 15 April 2018 !!!

See the list of session topics of ICHA2018.

 

ICHA2018: Sessions announced (Nantes, October 2018)

The 18th edition of the International Conference on Harmful Algae (ICHA2018) will take place on 21-26 October 2018 in Nantes, France. The session topics of ICHA2018 were recently announced; they cover all aspects of marine and freshwater HABs.

The deadline for abstract submission is 15 April 2018.

 

Just published : January 2018 issue of the “Freshwater HABs Newsletter” (US-EPA) (available online)

The January 2018 Issue of the US-EPA “Freshwater HABs Newsletter” (published by Dr. Lesley V. D’Anglada) is now available through the USEPA’s CyanoHABs Website.

It features the new International Benthic HABs Workgroup, the Great Lakes HABs collaboratory Video, the open-accesss CYANOCOST special issue in AOL, upcoming events, published articles and important links.

You can download the Newsletter here.

 

PhD Position: Freshwater Plankton Biodiversity – Univ. of Cologne, Germany

At the Cologne Biocenter, a 3-year, DFG funded PhD project is available within the priority programme SPP1704 “DynaTrait” for a research project on Trait-related feedback dynamics in natural plankton communities. The project involves field work (mesocosm experiments), laboratory experiments and analyses in the laboratory using methods of analytical chemistry and molecular biology.
Successful candidates should have a strong background in ecology, biodiversity research or related fields. Experience in plankton ecology, analytical chemistry (GC, HPLC) and statistical methods are desirable. A strong ability for conceptual thinking and experimental design is essential. Further, a Diploma or MSc degree in Natural Sciences is required; a driving licence (for the field work) would be advantageous. The position is based in Cologne, but willingness to travel for field work to Bavaria is expected. Proficiency in English is essential, additional knowledge in German is helpful, but not mandatory.

The position is funded with 65% of German TVL-13 salary level for 3 years It is available starting March 2018.
Applications should be in English and include a cover letter, C.V., and names and contact-details of two references. Please submit applications electronically to patrick.fink@uni-koeln.de until February 2nd, 2018. Women are particularly encouraged to apply. Physically handicapped persons will be given preference in case of equal qualification.

You can download the position description here.

Contact: Dr. Patrick Fink
University of Cologne
Workgroup Aquatic Chemical Ecology
Zülpicher Strasse 47b
50674 Köln, Germany
E-mail: patrick.fink@uni-koeln.de

 

“Safeguarding Biodiversity Data for the Future”, Brussels, 27-28 February 2018

An invitation by Aaike De Wever, distributed by Annick Wilmotte:

Dear colleague,

We are pleased to invite you for our event “Safeguarding Biodiversity Data for the Future”. This conference & workshop of the “Saving Freshwater Biodiversity Research Data” project will take place at the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences on Tuesday 27th & Wednesday 28th February 2018.

During this conference we specifically aim to share the lessons learned from the project and put our work in a broader perspective. Three keynote speakers will provide their view on working with large datasets, the need for Open Data and Open Science.

  • Jonathan Chase from the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) will share insights from his work on biodiversity synthesis.
  • Jörg Freyhof based at the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) will offer a global perspective on biodiversity observation data based on his experience in working on the EU BioFresh project and the Group on Earth Observation Biodiversity Observation Network (GEO BON).
  • Julia Stewart Lowndes from the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) will present a strong case for Open Science sharing the story of building the Ocean Health Index.

The workshop on Biodiversity Data Management on day 2 represents an excellent opportunity to get guidance and learn simple tricks to improve your day-to-day data management. In the afternoon, we give an introduction into biodiversity data standardisation and publication and offer the opportunity to choose between hands-on data transformation exercise and working with microbial ecology data. This workshop is highly recommended for students and researchers looking to improve their data management skills.

Get inspired and learn what you can do for “Safeguarding Biodiversity Data for the Future” during our conference on February 27th and workshop on February 28th! Have a look at the full program in attachment, register at: https://goo.gl/forms/NX8Ao1B5ACoV7Hef1 and motivate your colleagues to join as well.

You can download the agenda here.

Looking forward to welcome you there!

With best regards,
Aaike De Wever
Operational Directorate Natural Environment
Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences
Vautierstraat 29, 1000 Brussels, Belgium
tel.: +32(0)2 627 43 90
 

Distribution of Toxic Cyanobacteria and Cyanotoxins in Turkish Waterbodies

A recent paper by Latife Koker et al. (2017) presents results of the ‘SIYANOTOKS’ project that was carried out in Turkey by the Ministry of Forestry and Water Affairs, the General Directorate of Water Management in cooperation with the research group of Prof. Reyhan Akcaalan and Prof. Meric Albay, of Istanbul University, Faculty of Fisheries (now Faculty of Aquatic Sciences).
The project  monitored cyanobacteria and their toxins in 18 selected waterbodies in Turkey: 7 natural lakes, 8 reservoirs, 1 lagoon and 2 coastal and transitional waters
in Turkey. Potentially toxic cyanobacteria species were detected in 14 waterbodies and blooms were observed in 57% of them. A highest concentration of Microcystin-LR eq. was 29.7 μg/l and cylindrospermopsin was 9 μg/l. These results showed that cyanotoxin problems are very common in Turkish surface waters and regulation in drinking and
recreational waters should be implemented. The paper acknowledges CYANOCOST for networking and sharing of knowledge.

Reference: Koker et al. (2017), Journal of Environmental Protection and Ecology, 18(2), 425-432. Available on-line (open access).