Request for collaborators – FunAqua project

Dear CyanoCOST Members and colleagues,

We are looking for collaborators to a unique global water sampling project with an overall objective to describe the global diversity of aquatic fungi and determine the abiotic drivers of fungal communities. Please find the description of the project :

http://pk.emu.ee/en/structure/hydrobiologyandfishery/research/projects/international-projects/funaqua/ 

Let us know if you are interested in participating by registering in the google sheet .

We also ask you to share this invitation with your colleagues and enthusiastic amateurs.

Sincerely,
Kristel Panksep and the FunAqua core team

Kristel Panksep,

FunAqua project coordinator, Estonian University of Life Sciences, Centre for Limnology, University of Tartu, Institute of Ecology and earth Sciences, Chair of Mycology​

kristel.panksep@emu.ee

PhD Position: Freshwater Plankton Biodiversity – Univ. of Cologne, Germany

At the Cologne Biocenter, a 3-year, DFG funded PhD project is available within the priority programme SPP1704 “DynaTrait” for a research project on Trait-related feedback dynamics in natural plankton communities. The project involves field work (mesocosm experiments), laboratory experiments and analyses in the laboratory using methods of analytical chemistry and molecular biology.
Successful candidates should have a strong background in ecology, biodiversity research or related fields. Experience in plankton ecology, analytical chemistry (GC, HPLC) and statistical methods are desirable. A strong ability for conceptual thinking and experimental design is essential. Further, a Diploma or MSc degree in Natural Sciences is required; a driving licence (for the field work) would be advantageous. The position is based in Cologne, but willingness to travel for field work to Bavaria is expected. Proficiency in English is essential, additional knowledge in German is helpful, but not mandatory.

The position is funded with 65% of German TVL-13 salary level for 3 years It is available starting March 2018.
Applications should be in English and include a cover letter, C.V., and names and contact-details of two references. Please submit applications electronically to patrick.fink@uni-koeln.de until February 2nd, 2018. Women are particularly encouraged to apply. Physically handicapped persons will be given preference in case of equal qualification.

You can download the position description here.

Contact: Dr. Patrick Fink
University of Cologne
Workgroup Aquatic Chemical Ecology
Zülpicher Strasse 47b
50674 Köln, Germany
E-mail: patrick.fink@uni-koeln.de

 

“Safeguarding Biodiversity Data for the Future”, Brussels, 27-28 February 2018

An invitation by Aaike De Wever, distributed by Annick Wilmotte:

Dear colleague,

We are pleased to invite you for our event “Safeguarding Biodiversity Data for the Future”. This conference & workshop of the “Saving Freshwater Biodiversity Research Data” project will take place at the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences on Tuesday 27th & Wednesday 28th February 2018.

During this conference we specifically aim to share the lessons learned from the project and put our work in a broader perspective. Three keynote speakers will provide their view on working with large datasets, the need for Open Data and Open Science.

  • Jonathan Chase from the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) will share insights from his work on biodiversity synthesis.
  • Jörg Freyhof based at the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) will offer a global perspective on biodiversity observation data based on his experience in working on the EU BioFresh project and the Group on Earth Observation Biodiversity Observation Network (GEO BON).
  • Julia Stewart Lowndes from the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) will present a strong case for Open Science sharing the story of building the Ocean Health Index.

The workshop on Biodiversity Data Management on day 2 represents an excellent opportunity to get guidance and learn simple tricks to improve your day-to-day data management. In the afternoon, we give an introduction into biodiversity data standardisation and publication and offer the opportunity to choose between hands-on data transformation exercise and working with microbial ecology data. This workshop is highly recommended for students and researchers looking to improve their data management skills.

Get inspired and learn what you can do for “Safeguarding Biodiversity Data for the Future” during our conference on February 27th and workshop on February 28th! Have a look at the full program in attachment, register at: https://goo.gl/forms/NX8Ao1B5ACoV7Hef1 and motivate your colleagues to join as well.

You can download the agenda here.

Looking forward to welcome you there!

With best regards,
Aaike De Wever
Operational Directorate Natural Environment
Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences
Vautierstraat 29, 1000 Brussels, Belgium
tel.: +32(0)2 627 43 90
 

Like scuba diving and sponge biology ? Three PhD candidates in sponge biology / coral reef ecology at UvA

The Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics is looking for 3 excellent PhD candidates in sponge biology / coral reef ecology to join our team.

EU ERC Starting Grant: SPONGE ENGINE — Fast and efficient sponge engines drive and modulate the food web of reef ecosystems

Coral reefs are iconic examples of biological hotspots, highly appreciated because of their ecosystem services. Yet, they are threatened by human impact and climate change, highlighting the need to develop tools and strategies to curtail changes in these ecosystems. Remarkably, ever since Darwin’s descriptions of coral reefs, it has been a mystery how one of Earth’s most productive and diverse ecosystems thrives in oligotrophic seas, as an oasis in a marine desert. Our team recently discovered the ‘sponge loop’ pathway (De Goeij et al. Science 2013) that efficiently retains and transfers energy and nutrients on the reef. We recognized sponges as potential (and so far neglected) key ecosystem drivers, and accumulated evidence on sponge loops in other ecosystems, such as deep-sea coral reefs. As a result, current reef food web models, lacking sponge-driven resource cycling, are incomplete and need to be redeveloped. However, mechanisms that determine the capacity of sponge ‘engines’, how they are fuelled, and drive communities are unknown.

The aim of this ERC project is to systematically establish the novel reef food web framework, integrating sponges as key ecosystem drivers. To this end, sponges will be evaluated on functional traits (morphology, associated microbes, pumping rate) in the processing of dissolved food, the main fuel of the engine. At the community level, we will assess to what extent these different traits are a driving force in structuring reef ecosystems, from fuel input (primary producers) to engine output (driving and modulating the consumer food web). This framework derived from a Caribbean reef ecosystem will then be implemented in a sponge-driven food web model, a much-needed foundation to test and predict future scenarios of changes in reef communities. Ultimately, we will test and generalize the novel food web framework at a tropical Indo-Pacific, a temperate Mediterranean, and a cold-water North-Atlantic reef.

See details for those positions in the Euraxess page.