Special Issue “Biological Role of Cyanotoxins: Experimental and In-Field Evidence” -Toxins

Dear Colleagues,

Cyanobacteria are an ancient lineage of oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria found in a broad range of habitats, from soil to oceans, where they play important roles in the global nitrogen and carbon cycles. They are known for the toxic blooms they form in fresh water bodies around the world and the production of toxins, posing a threat to human and environmental health. Despite the tremendous effort to understand the biosynthesis, toxicity, and occurrence of cyanobacteria secondary metabolites, the biological role of these compounds still remains relatively unknown.  Various hypotheses in this regard have been put forward, encompassing both intracellular effects such as nutrient storage, light adaptation, and protection against oxidative stress, and extracellular functions including quorum sensing, allelopathic interactions, nutrient acquisition, colony formation, and grazing defense. The existing evidence on the potential role of cyanotoxins is mostly based on experimental studies and require further confirmation by in-field observations.

This Special Issue is destined to gather reviews, original experimental papers, and short notes reporting findings on experimental and in-field observations that aim to advance our understanding of the biological role of cyanotoxins.

Dr. Spyros Gkelis
Dr. Piotr Rzymski
Guest Editors

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019

Special issue webpage.

Save the date: 19th ICHA October 11-16, 2020. La Paz, B.C.S. Mexico

The 19th International Conference on Harmful Algae will take place from the 11th to the 16th of October 2020 in La Paz, BCS, Mexico, being the 2nd ICHA conference held in Latin America. As the last conferences, the 2020 conference will include topics related with the understanding of the causes, evolution and impacts of harmful microalgae and cyanobacteria. We are planning an enjoyable meeting where scientists can present their research, share their ideas, establish new collaborations, and connect the science on harmful algae with the beneficiaries of this research.

La Paz is an ideal city for the meeting where many academic institutes are found. It is a small, secure and quiet city, with beautiful surroundings, which is visited by many international tourists and academics year round. The average temperature in October is between 21 and 34 °C.

For some countries a visa may be required. Please check visa regulations well in advance with your local Mexican Consulate for official instructions on the specific visa regulations and application procedures.

As the major host of the conference, ISSHA will support the event with various activities: Travel awards to students and post-docs, several achievement awards, and ISSHA auction.

Looking forward to seeing you in La Paz, Mexico!

The Organizing Committee,

www.icha2020.com

“Mitigation of cyanobacteria in lakes by dilute hydrogen peroxide”- Dr Petra Visser at NCSR Demokritos

Dr Petra Visser is giving a lecture on “Mitigation of cyanobacteria in lakes by dilute hydrogen peroxide” in the Library Hall of NCSR Demokritos, on 21st March 2019 at 13:00.

Dr Petra Visser is Associate Professor in the Department of Freshwater and Marine Ecology, Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics, University of Amsterdam. Her research interests include physiology and ecology of cyanobacteria and algae, toxic cyanobacteria, eutrophication, water management, macroalgae, benthic cyanobacterial mats, coral reefs. She has carried out pioneering work on the use of hydrogen peroxide for selective suppression of harmful cyanobacteria in entire lakes. Among others, she has been Leader of the Working Group “Prevention and Control of Toxic Cyanobacteria and Cyanotoxins” of the CYANOCOST network and Editor of a recent Special Issue on “Cyanobacterial blooms – Ecology, prevention, mitigation and control” in Aquatic Ecology.

Description of the event

 

Frontiers Research Topic: Impact of Mycotoxins, Cyanotoxins and Phycotoxins in Food Sustainability

From the webpage of the Frontiers Research Topic:

A sustainable food system is insecure if toxins are a threat. There are three types of natural non-proteinaceous toxins that compromise reliability of food systems: cyanotoxins for freshwater aquatic products, phycotoxins for seafood, and mycotoxins mainly for cereals (also for other plant-based foods and food-products of animal origin).

This Research Topic aims to focus on several knowledge gaps that require in-depth research, with an emphasis on new or emerging toxins recently appearing due to global warming and international trade. In this context, several important issues related to toxins stand out for which new information and scientific evidence should be provided. These issues include: monitoring and analytical challenges (including the requirement for certified reference materials), the need for better understanding of toxin mode of action and toxicology, as well as the need to improve risk assessment, and the development of novel mitigation strategies.

We invite scientists from these relevant fields to contribute to this exciting area of research that combines pharmacology, analytical chemistry, toxicology, mycology, phycology, and food safety.

Topic Editors : Luis M. Botana, Panagiota Katikou, Maria J. Sainz, Alison Robertson

View details about this Research Topic here.

 

 

WRF Webcast: Managing Intracellular Cyanotoxin Release During Oxidation Processes in Drinking Water Treatment Plants

Thu, Mar 21, 2019 3:00 PM EDT (9:00 PM EET), 1 hour 30 min

Utilities have been seeking guidance to effectively control cyanobacteria cells and eliminate cyanotoxins using holistic management and treatment strategies. Current guidance suggests that switching water sources or removing intact cells can minimize the risk of releasing intracellular (or cell-bound) cyanotoxins. Our presenters will discuss options to use when this operational flexibility is unavailable, including the deliberate release and treatment of intracellular cyanotoxins using oxidation processes. In addition, the incorporation of intracellular cyanotoxin release into the upcoming CyanoTOX Tool (Version 3) will be presented. The webcast will include information from the WRF Tailored Collaboration project, Release of Intracellular Cyanotoxins During Oxidation of Naturally Occurring and Lab Cultured Cyanobacteria (#4692), which highlights ways to improve available guidance to utilities regarding the release of intracellular cyanotoxins during oxidation of naturally occurring and lab-cultured cyanobacteria.

Presenters:
Eric Wert, PhD, PE, Project Manager, Water Quality Research and Development, Southern Nevada Water Authority
Craig Adams, PhD, PE, Oliver Parks Professor of Engineering, Department of Civil Engineering, Saint Louis University
Katie Greenstein, PhD, PE, Chemist, Des Moines Water Works
Eric Rosenfeldt, PhD, PE, Senior Principal Engineer, Hazen and Sawyer
Arash Zamyadi, PhD, Assistant Professor, Polytechnique Montreal, University of Montreal, Canada

Moderator:
Djanette Khiari, PhD, Research Manager, The Water Research Foundation

Register here.

WRF logo

Training on the preservation of cyanobacteria – September 2019, Belgium

Dear CYANOCOST members,

The Belgian Consortium of Culture Collections of Microorganisms is organizing a training on the preservation of bacteria, cyanobacteria or microalgae from the 17th to 20th of September 2019 as explained by the PDF in attachment.

More details on the programme are given on the website  : http://bccm.belspo.be/content/bccm-training-venue-and-accommodation
Note that this training is modular, with a main ‘hands on’ training of 3 days on one type of biological material and one optional day dedicated either to another type of biological material (demos) or to a seminar on the practical management of culture collections (including Quality Management System and the legal requirements) or a seminar on gene technology tools.

If you know scientists who could be interested, please forward them the information!

Download: BCCM_training_annoncement

Many thanks and best regards,

Annick Wilmotte
Wilmotte card

Erasmus International CYano-week (EIC), Cyprus, 19-22 March 2019

Dear All,

The Water Treatment Laboratory-AQUA of the Cyprus University of Technology cordially invites academic staff and researchers to its Erasmus International CYano-week (EIC) which is the 1st Symposium on Harmful Cyanobacteria in Cyprus. EIC-week will take place in Limassol, Cyprus, between 19-22 March 2019 under the Erasmus+ Exchange programme for both Teaching Staff (STA) and Staff Training (STT) mobilities. During this event, innovations in the field of toxic cyanobacteria will be presented by leading scientists whereas all participants are invited to present their studies and experience with cyanobacteria and their toxins in a short lecture.

The purpose of EIC-week is to gather scientists from Erasmus partner universities to share their knowledge on Cyanobacteria and their Toxic Metabolites while providing an excellent international learning environment and promoting networking among participants and students. During this week, host organization and participants are invited to give a scientific presentation on their research activities related on cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins. Event participants will be asked to deliver a 20-minute presentation and a short presentation (approx. 10 min) about the Erasmus Opportunities that their home institution offers to the students and academic personnel of CUT. To be compatible with the requirements of the Erasmus+ Week program, both presentations are important if the participant is coming from an Erasmus partner university.

TOPICS

  • Detection and identification of cyanobacterial species
  • Detection and identification of cyanobacterial metabolites
  • Ιn-Situ Treatment for cyano-HABs control
  • Utilization of cyanobacterial biomass for useful products
  • Cyanotoxins and Food Safety
  • Monitoring and restoration of cyanobacterial contaminated sites
  • Ecology of cyanobacteria
  • Toxicity of cyanobacteria and their metabolites
  • Removal of cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins from water treatment plants
  • Health effects and exposure to cyanotoxins

Abstract Deadline is 10th March 2019 (Click here for abstract template)

Besides the “1st Symposium on Harmful Cyanobacteria in Cyprus”, attendees will have the opportunity to participate to field sampling events in cyanobacterial contaminated sites in Cyprus, a workshop on in-situ treatments for cyano-HABs mitigation and meetings with companies (Cyprus Research and Innovation Center -CYRIC) that engage in research activities related to cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins. (Click here for preliminary program)

It is important to note, that there is no participation fee to this event. The CYano-Week is eligible for funding under the Erasmus mobility KA1 programme. Participants should contact the Erasmus Office and request to cover their mobility expenses either through training (no need to have a signed Erasmus agreement between the universities) or through teaching (need for a signed agreement and presentation is mandatory) . Anyone that wants to join CYanoWeek on its own expenses is more than welcome!

Looking forward to seeing you in Cyprus,

Maria G. Antoniou (Ph.D.)

Assistant Professor, Cyprus University of Technology, Department of Environmental Science and Technology, Water Treatment Laboratory-Aqua

http://wtl-aqua.weebly.com/

https://cyanoscyfr.weebly.com/

Corner of Athinon and Anexartisias 57, PO Box: 50329, 3036 Lemesos, Cyprus, Tel: +357 25002277, Fax: +357 25002842, Email: maria.antoniou@cut.ac.cy , www.cut.ac.cy

Special Issue “Freshwater Cyanobacterial Toxins: Developments in Monitoring, Identification, Impacts and Factors Influencing Production” – Toxins

Dear Colleagues,

Freshwater cyanobacteria are known to produce a suite of different chemicals that can be toxic to many organisms. These toxins can have adverse impacts on humans, animals, and even aquatic and terrestrial plants. Further information about cyanobacterial toxins is required to better understand and manage their risks in freshwater environments. This Special Issue aims to bring together papers that provide new information on the monitoring of cyanobacterial toxins and the identification of toxins in freshwater environments. Further, papers are invited that develop our knowledge of how cyanobacterial toxins impact humans, as well as different aquatic and terrestrial organisms. Papers that better develop our understanding of how toxin production by cyanobacteria is regulated are also welcomed.

Assoc. Prof. Simon Mitrovic
Dr. Ambrose Furey
Guest Editors

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2019.

Visit the Special Issue webpage here.

 

 

Genotoxic effects of the cyanobacterial pentapeptide nodularin in HepG2 cells

A new paper by Stern et al., published in Food and Chemical Toxicology, provides evidence for ROS-mediated genotoxic effects of Nodularin. From the abstract:

“The cyanobacterial pentapeptide nodularin (NOD), mainly produced by genus Nodularia, is a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatases PP1 and PP2A, and causes animal mortality. The few studies available indicate that NOD is a potential non-genotoxic carcinogen. In the present study we evaluated NOD (0.01, 0.1 and 1 μg/ml) genotoxic activity in human hepatoma (HepG2) cells with the comet, γH2AX and cytokinesis block micronucleus cytome assays. In addition, induction of oxidative stress was studied. Moreover changes in the expression of selected genes from the P53 pathway, involved in the response to DNA damage (P53, GADD45α, CDKN1A, MDM2), apoptosis (BAX, BCL2) and oxidative stress (GPX1, GSR, GCLC, CAT, SOD1) were determined using qPCR. Non-cytotoxic concentrations induced time and dose dependant increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and substantially increased the formation of oxidative DNA damage. In addition, elevated formation of micronuclei was detected. For the first time it has been shown that NOD deregulated the mRNA level of DNA damage (CDKN1A, GADD45α) and oxidative stress (GPX1, GSR, GCLC, CAT and SOD1) responsive genes and anti-apoptotic gene BCL2. Our results provide new evidence that NOD genotoxic effects are mediated through ROS production, already at low environmentally relevant concentrations.”

The paper acknowledges CYANOCOST.

Reference:

A. Štern, A. Rotter, M. Novak, M. Filipič, B. Žegura (2019). Genotoxic effects of the cyanobacterial pentapeptide nodularin in HepG2 cells. Food and Chemical Toxicology 124, 349-358. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fct.2018.12.019

A review of BMAA and its isomeric amino acids in cyanobacteria and cyanobacteria -based food supplements

A review paper on occurrence of BMAA and related compounds in cyanobacteria and food supplements by was recently published by Manolidi et al. in Journal of Hazardous Materials.

“The review critically discusses existing reports regarding the occurrence of BMAA, DAB and AEG in cyanobacteria and cyanobacteria-based food supplements. It is shown that inconsistencies in reported results could be attributed to performance of different methods of extraction and analysis applied and in ambiguities regarding determination of soluble and bound fractions of the compounds. The critical aspect of this review aims to grow awareness of human intake of neurotoxic amino acids, while results presented in literature concerning dietary supplements aim to promote further research, quality control as well as development of guidelines for cyanotoxins in food products.”

The review paper acknowledges CYANOCOST.

Reference:

Korina Manolidi, Theodoros M. Triantis, Triantafyllos Kaloudis, Anastasia Hiskia (2019). Neurotoxin BMAA and its isomeric amino acids in cyanobacteria and cyanobacteria-based food supplements. Journal of Hazardous Materials 365, 346-365. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhazmat.2018.10.084